July 6, 2016

July 5, 2016

July 5, 2016

hindsight is always 20/20 — remember this

July 5, 2016

what is coming is better than what is gone

March 18, 2016

March 18, 2016

mood

essecreative:SHIT SHIT SHIT (happens)
by Simone Baldocchi

March 18, 2016

James Hillman

Anytime you’re gonna grow, you’re gonna lose something. You’re losing what you’re hanging onto to keep safe. You’re losing habits that you’re comfortable with, you’re losing familiarity.

March 18, 2016

How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “You’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

February 15, 2016

myself on how to become a better person this summer

  • Wake up and open your curtains. Your windows too.
  • Drink some tea or coffee, whatever pleases you. Notice every sip.
  • Have some fresh fruit and finish breakfast feeling full.
  • Stand outside and feel the air. Cool or warm, it will make you feel real.
  • Get some exercise. Yoga to soothe, running to breathe, lifting for strength.
  • Take care of your body. Have a nice shower and pamper as much as you want afterward.
  • If you’re going to work, remember you have the chance to make anyone’s day or to ruin it. Act accordingly.
  • Weed out the bad language. It’s only creating tension in your body and mind. Kind words are infinitely more appreciated.
  • Take some time each day to improve your mind. Keep reading that great book. Listen to an incredible piece of music. Practice an instrument or a skill. The progress is its own reward.
  • Pictures will help you remember how wonderful life is. But spend less time on your phone and more time seeing the world face to face.
  • Go to sleep knowing that you have done well. Tomorrow is there with room to become even better.
February 15, 2016

Daniell Koepke

You don’t need anyone’s affection or approval in order to be good enough. When someone rejects or abandons or judges you, it isn’t actually about you. It’s about them and their own insecurities, limitations, and needs, and you don’t have to internalize that. Your worth isn’t contingent upon other people’s acceptance of you — it’s something inherent. You exist, and therefore, you matter. You’re allowed to voice your thoughts and feelings. You’re allowed to assert your needs and take up space. You’re allowed to hold onto the truth that who you are is exactly enough. And you’re allowed to remove anyone from your life who makes you feel otherwise.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,462 other followers